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Zoroastrian Heritage

Author: K. E. Eduljee

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Contents

Cyrus the Great

Page 1

Cyrus and the Creation of the Persian Empire

Media and Babylon

Overthrow of Media

Conquest of Lydia

Conquest of Babylon

Clay Cylinder - Cyrus' Liberation of Babylon

Cyrus in the Bible

Cyrus' Ecumenical Approach

Demise & Tomb of Cyrus

Page 2 - Pasargadae, Capital of Cyrus

Site Location & Structures

Palace Complex

Tall-e Takht

Cyrus the Great & Cyrus Cylinder Series

Cyrus the Great - His Religion & Inspiration

Cyrus the Great - Information Sources

Cyrus the Great - Hebrew Bible Quotes

Cyrus Cylinder

Cyrus Cylinder - its Discoverer Hormuzd Rassam

Cyrus Cylinder - Contents (Eduljee)

Cyrus Cylinder - Translation (Rogers)

Cyrus Cylinder - Translation (Finkel)

Cyrus Cylinder - its Remarkable Discovery

Cyrus' Edict & the Chinese Cuneiform Bones

Cyrus Cylinder: Talk by Neil MacGregor, Dir. British Museum

Page 2: Pasargadae, Capital of Cyrus


» Suggested prior reading: Early Persian History. Formation of Persia and the Achaemenian Dynasty

» Related reading: Cyropaedia by Xenophon


» Preceding page 1: King Cyrus II, the Great. Formation of the Achaemenian Persian Empire


Site Location & Structures

King Cyrus II, the Great, located his capital city, palace and tomb at Pasargadae (or Pasargad / Pasargada). Pasargadae is situated on the Dasht-e Morghab, the plain of Morghab, some 25 kilometres long and 12 kilometres wide. The name was derived from the earlier Old Persian Batrakatash and later Old Persian Pathragad.

According to Strabo (c. 62 BCE - c.24 CE) in his Geography 15.3.8, the Cyrus built Pasargadae on the site where, in 550 BCE, he had defeated the Medes commanded by King Astyages.


Satellite relief map of the Marv Dasht (large green area) valley plains and Persian historical sites. click to see a larger map
Google Satellite relief map of the Marv Dasht (large green area) valley plains and Persian historical sites.
Brown areas are surrounding hills
click to see a larger map

Pasargadae is also located in the valley of the river Polvar. In ancient times, there were at least eight dams that regulated the river and stored water for irrigation.


A close up of the Pasargadae site
The Polvar River that runs through the plains of Morghab, the Dasht-e Morghab

The present site is 1.6 square kilometres in size and includes the structure commonly believed to be the mausoleum of Cyrus (shown in page 1), the Tall-e Takht fortress that sits on top of a small hill, the audience and royal residential palaces, and gardens, the earliest known example of the chahar bagh, meaning four-garden, design. For a more detailed discussion on the chahar bagh design please see our page on Persian Gardens.


View of the Pasargadae site looking South-west across the Dasth-e Morgab
View of the Pasargadae site looking South-west across the Dasht-e Morghab
from Tall-e Takht, a fortress built on a small hill
A close up of the Pasargadae site
A close up of the Pasargadae site from Tall-e Takht
Satellite view showing location of the structures at the Pasargadae site
Google Satellite view showing location of the structures at the Pasargadae site

Click here to view a larger map
Satellite image from Google. Zoom in to see a close-up of the structures

Palace Complex

Layout of the Pasargadae palace complex. Gate A is the entrance building to the complex. Palace S, situated just across the river is the apadana or audience hall. The chahar bagh gardens are flanked by pavilions A and B. Palace P is thought to be the private royal residence
Layout of the Pasargadae palace complex
Gate A is the entrance building to the complex
Palace S, situated just across the river is the apadana or audience hall
The chahar bagh gardens are flanked by pavilions A and B
Palace P is thought to be the private royal residence
Entrance gate house to the Pasargadae palace complex
Entrance gate house to the Pasargadae palace complex
Reconstruction drawing of the apadana or audience hall at Pasargadae
Reconstruction drawing of the apadana or audience hall at Pasargadae
Pavilion B with Tall-e Takht fortress in the background
Pavilion B with Tall-e Takht fortress in the background
Ruins of the structure thought to be the private royal residence at Pasargadae
Ruins of the structure thought to be the private royal residence at Pasargadae


Tall-e Takht

Remnant of a wall of the Tall-e Takht fortress
Remnant of a wall of the Tall-e Takht fortress

Tall means hill and takht means throne. The name Tall-e Takht means Hill of the Throne or Throne Hill. The fortress guarded the surrounding area.


» Page 1


» Related reading: Cyropaedia by Xenophon

Further reading:
» Chahar Bagh Gardens at Pasargadae
» Kabujiya / Cambyses II & Gaumata


At our blogsite:
» Cyrus the Great - His Religion & Inspiration
» Cyrus the Great - Information Sources
» Cyrus the Great - Hebrew Bible Quotes
» Cyrus Cylinder
» Cyrus Cylinder - its Discoverer Hormuzd Rassam
» Cyrus Cylinder - Contents (Eduljee)
» Cyrus Cylinder - Translation (Rogers)
» Cyrus Cylinder - Translation (Finkel)
» Cyrus Cylinder - its Remarkable Discovery
» Cyrus' Edict & the Chinese Cuneiform Bones
» Cyrus Cylinder: Talk by Neil MacGregor, Dir. British Museum


» Site Contents

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